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DEDICATED 
TO 

PROGRESSIVE MEDICAL EDUCATION 



Charles S. Cameron, M.D. 

President 

To the Class of 1971, Greetings: 

Several years ago, the President of a large 
pharmaceutical manufacturing company had 
this to say in testimony before a Congression- 
al Committee: 

"Let me tell you about a man I know. A 
graduate of one of our leading medical schools, 
he had completed his internship and residency 
training and had passed his medical state 
board examinations. 

"He felt qualified to practice medicine and 
opened his office. Soon he was treating pa- 
tients — but what treatment ! 

"He used no penicillin or broad spectrum 
antibiotics; he never prescribed antihyperten- 
sive or anitcoagulant drugs. He never worried 
about the Rh factor in pregnant women or the 
need for replacement transfusions in new born 
babies. 

"He did not even consider the use of corti- 
sone in arthritis or nephrosis, and he never 
thought of treating an allergic condition with 
antihistamines. 

"He did not give his young patients tetanus 
toxoid or polio vaccine, nor did he give his old- 
er patients tranquilizing drugs. He made diag- 
noses of congenital heart disease but he did 
not advise treatment by surgery. 

"He cared for patients in the hospital and 
often he and the hospital both suffered finan- 
cial loss, yet he never encouraged his patients 
to buy hospital insurance. 

"Perhaps you are wondering how any indi- 
vidual of this type could be given his degree in 
medicine, much less be allowed to take care of 
the sick. I can assure you that it was both ethi- 
cal and legal. For the man was I, and the year 
was 1928." 

It was a dramatic way of demonstrating the 
pace of progress in medicine, and today, we 
could add a few more examples to those he cit- 
ed. Most of them represent developments of 
medicine as a science; as such we acknowledge 
them respectfully and gratefully, and we look 
forward to more of like importance — and in 
your time. 

This unprecedented measure of the doctors' 




ability to control diseases is not without its hazard, however. The emergence 
of science as the strong arm of the corpus of medical practice has in it some- 
thing which threatens the other arm, which I may as well call what it has al- 
ways been called — the art of medicine. I suspect that, here, some of you may 
turn the page, saying "ho hum — not that again!" But try as I have, I cannot 
offer anything which I consider worth more as a last word to you. 

By the art of medicine I do not mean the intuitive, sixth-sense kind of per- 
ception which comes to the intelligent mind after years of observation and 
experience. This is part of the art, of course, but I am referring to something 
more: the art of medicine as the heart of medicine and to be more specific, as 
the heart of the physician. It is above sympathy — feeling sorry for the pa- 
tient. It is empathy — feeling with the patient. It is giving something of your 
spirit as well as something in the ampoule. This empathy will not cure pneu- 
monia as effectively as penicillin will, but there are components of every ill- 
ness which it alone will manage. I venture to hope that you will recognize it for 
the good medicine it is and will be, so long as the human condition is essential- 
ly as it is, and no matter what wonders science will work in the years to come. 

As you go, I extend to each of you, personally and for the Trustees this sin- 
cere expression of our goodwill, of our admiration of your submission to the 
discipline of these years here, and our wish for a long life, rich in the satisfac- 
tions that come from the practice of the science and the art of medicine. 

Cordially yours, 



Charles S. Cameron, M.D. 
Chairman of the Board and 
Acting President 



Joseph R. DiPalma M.D. 

Dean 

Dear Graduate: 

We are in an era when it is gener- 
ally considered that there have been 
and are to be vast improvements in 
education. Because of the easy 
availability of communications 
gadgetry such as taped sequences, 
T.V. devices, computers, etc, there 
is a tendency to believe that knowl- 
edge may be more easily acquired. 
Students are far more assumptive 
and assert that in most instances 
they do not need drill, repetition, 
didactic exercises, instructors, 
examinations, marks and the other 
familiar paraphenalia of classical 
education. In short most students 
are satisifed with thin upper crust 
of knowledge in a subject — after all 
won't it all be obsolete in a couple 
of years! and I'm not going to use 
this subject anyhow! 

Yes, there have been many ad- 
vances in education. Unfortunate- 
ly, these advantages are dissapated 
because at the same time there has 
been a decline of values and atti- 
tudes. True, the modern graduate 
knows more medicine and therapy 
than all the combined medical 
greats of a past era; false, that he is 
any wiser. Nor does he really poss- 
ess unique knowledge not available 
to the general public. Thus, the 
watcher of T.V. Doctor programs 
and the reader of Newsweek has a 
superficial information not much 
inferior to the average M. D. There is a very great difference between mere knowledge and erudition. 

It seems to me that the truly great physicians had always one quality in common — a profound mastery of their sub- 
ject which could only stem from a lifetime of dedication and devotion. Theirs was not the instant success of a taped 
program — the good fortune to just be in the right place at the right time. Genuinely great accomplishment is won under 
adverse circumstances and usually does not come easily without some exposure to failure. 

Don't be ashamed to be a compendium of useless knowledge. The modern conveniences for the acquisition of infor- 
mation should by all means be used and exploited but they should not be a substitute for storing and integration of 
facts in your own brain. Only in this manner will it be possible for you to realize the potential of new information — to 
make these chance associations which some call serendipidity — or in a more real sense clinical acumen. 

Let me also point out that the great pleasure of intellectual effort is a satiation of the ego and this is not matched by 
any automated device. 

Happy learning — 








/?. /£&&**. 



Joseph R. DiPalma M.D. 
Dean 



Hugh D. Bennett M.D. 

Associate Dean 



TO THE MEMBERS OF 
THE GRADUATING 
CLASS -1971: 

Graduation time is a time for 
mutual thanks and congratula- 
tions. I do so congratulate your 
class upon successfully accom- 
plishing a very difficult curricu- 
lum and upon possessing those 
traits and characteristics which 
we of the faculty and you of the 
student body together perceive 
as essential to the practice of 
Medicine. I thoroughly enjoyed 
working with your class as we 
mutually struggled to establish a 
new and more versatile training 
program. You have handled the 
vicissitudes of new courses, 
changing equipment, inadequate 
space, money and faculty shor- 
tages, with magnificent toler- 
ance and an understanding of 
what the faculty was attempting 
to accomplish and of their prob- 
lems as well as of your own. 

You will be told by those who 
have taught you that you are the 
best prepared class in the history 
of Hahnemann. This is, of 
course, true when your training 
and your accomplishments are 
compared to all others before 
you. Preparation, however, is in 
relation to the needs of the indi- 
vidual to cope with the situation 
which faces that individual. 
Under these criteria, you may 
not be the best prepared class 

but the least prepared class. The problems that face the medical profession exceed by far any preparation 
be offered by a dedicated faculty or grasped by an energetic, enthusiastic student body. 




which can 



Your class has in it a mixture of individuals, those attempting to develop better delivery of health services within 
our current system and those hoping to initiate change to a better system for delivering health care. The common 
denominator in all of you is, I believe, a real desire to render ever greater service to humanity as represented by your 
patients. I submit to you that were each physician to function conscientiously on his own to deliver medical serv- 
ices with maximum efficiency and humanity, that these services would improve no matter what was the system for 
delivering such services. It is not the theory under which services had been delivered that is faulty, but rather the 
mode of delivery. You each thus have a role to play in these changing times. The majority to strive to deliver excel- 
lence of service and the few to attempt to alter the mode of delivery, so that the majority may better perform. My 
own hope for your class is that it contains a large number of highly dedicated individuals capable of placing theoret- 
ical concepts into clear, unwarped, clean realities, and few, equally dedicated, capable of developing new workable 
systems. If such be true then perhaps you truly are the best prepared class in Hahnemann's history. I sincerely be- 
lieve you are! 




iCp&Z^p* «»^ 



Hugh D. Bennett, M.D. 
Associate Dean 



THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES 



I swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, and Health, and 
All-heal, and all the gods and goddesses, that, according to my ability 
and judgment, I will keep this Oath and this stipulation — to reckon 
him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share 
my substances with him, and relieve his necessities if required; to look 
upon his offspring in the same footing as my own brothers, and to 
teach them this art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipula- 
tion; and that by precept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction, 
I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my 
teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to 
the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of 
regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for 
the benefit of my patients, and to abstain from whatever is deleterious 
and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to any if asked, nor 
suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a wom- 
an a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with holiness I will 
pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut persons laboring under 
the. stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners 
of this work. Into whatever houses I enter, I will go into them for the 
benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of mis- 
chief and corruption; and further, from the seduction of females or 
males, of freemen or slaves. Whatever, in connection with my profes- 
sional practice, or not in connection with it, I see or hear, in the life of 
men, which ought not to be spoken abroad, I will not divulge, as 
reckoning that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep 
this Oath unviolated, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and the 
practice of the Art, respected by all men in all times! But should I tres- 
pass and violate this Oath, may the reverse be my lot ! 



Other Members of the Hahnemann Family 




M^M. 




Crozer -Chester Medical Center 




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Magee Memorial Hospital St. Agnes Hospital 



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Philadelphia General Hospital 



Naval Hospital 








Friends Hospital Monmouth Medical Center 



Harrisburg Polyclinic Hospital 



To Our Parents 

On this, the first page of the Senior Section, we pause to pay trib- 
ute to two grand people. 

Through long years they have inspired our every effort to strive 
on. Their sacrifices have been great, indeed, that our names should 
appear on the pages that follow. 

Whether it be our fare to achieve distinction or not in our chosen 
profession, may we strive always to vindicate their profound faith in 



And in after years, when we turn the pages of this book, may this 
serve, always, as a reminder of the two whose devotion has made us 
physicians — 

MOTHER AND DAD. 



fMHW 



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LELAND R. ABBEY 

Mt. Vernon, New York 

Drew College B.A. 



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EDWARD B. ARENSON 
Greenwich, Connecticut 
Cornell University B.A. 





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STEPHEN BABIC 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Wesleyan University M.A. 



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Bingham ton, New York 
Bowdoin College A.B. 





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OLLICE BATES JR. 

Camden, New Jersey 

Rutgers University B.A. 



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JOSEPH M. BECKER 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Swarthmore College A.B. 





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JOSEPH M. BEDNAREK 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

St. Joseph's College B.S. 






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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University A.B. 





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Cohoes, New York 
Wheaton College B.S. 



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Altoona, Pennsylvania 
Cornell University A.B. 





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EDWARD M. BLEEDEN 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Temple University A.B. 



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Wyncote, Pennsylvania 
Temple University A.B. 

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Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

University of Pittsburgh B.S. 





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Woodbury, New Jersey 
University of Delaware B.A. 





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Allentown, 

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Westville, New Jersey 
Villanova University B.S. 





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Washington, D.C. 
Georgetown University B.S. 





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Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Lebanon Valley College B.S. 





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PAUL T.CASS 

Chester, Pennsylvania 

Juniata College B.S. 



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JEROME H. CHECK 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania A.B. 





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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

University of Virginia B.A. 





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Rimersburg, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University B.S. 





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Collingswood, New Jersey 

Rutgers University B.A. 



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PATRICIA A. CONVERY 

Brielle, New Jersey 

Pennsylvania State University B.S. 





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Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 

Pontitical College Josephinum B. A. 



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Linesville, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University B.S. 





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Merchantville, New Jersey 

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Westminster, Maryland 
Western Maryland College B.A. 




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JOHN E. DEVENNEY 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

St. Joseph's College B.S. 





MARTIN R. EICHELBERGER 
Santa Monica, California 
Princeton University B.A. 






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Lewisberg, Pennsylvania 

Lebanon Valley College B.S. 










FRANK R. ERVIN 

Springfield, New Jersey 
University of Pennsylvania B.A. 





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Mountain Lake, New Jersey 

Swarthmore College B.A. 



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Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph's College B.S. 





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THEODORE FINK 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Temple University A.B. 



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Irvington, New Jersey 
Rutgers University B.A. 








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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State University B.S. 









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RICHARD A. GAMBESCIA 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Temple University B.A. 



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Conshohocken, Pennsylvania 
Lehigh University B.S. 





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CAROL E. GIANNITTI 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Temple University A.B. 











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Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Dickinson College B.S. 





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HERBERT P. GOODHEART 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Temple University A.B. 





JAMES A. GOSPER 
Pennsauken, New Jersey 
Ursinus College B.S. 





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Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Lehigh University B.S. 





BARRY E. GRAHAM 
Enola, Pennsylvania 
Elizabethtown College B.S. 






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LOWELL T. GREENWALD 
Morristown, New Jersey 
Rutgers University B.A. 







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Duryea, Pennsylvania 
Goucher College A.B. 






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ROBERT H. HALE 

Frackville, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State University B.S. 



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Litchfield, Connecticut 
Ohio State University B.S. 





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Hillside, New Jersey 
Muhlenberg College B.S. 






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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Franklin and Marshall College A.B. 





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Hollsopple, Pennsylvania 

University of Pittsburgh B.S. 



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SHELDON R. KARASICK 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
C. W. Post College A.B. 





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GEORGE L. KIRKPATRICK 

Bradf ordwoods, Pennsylvania 

Johns Hopkins University B.A. 



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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Albion, College B.A. 





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CLARK F. KOPYCINSKI 

Erie, Pennsylvania 

Cannon College B.S. 



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GARY H. KRAMER 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Albright College B.S. 





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Sewickley, Pennsylvania 
Bucknell University B.S. 




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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University 





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JOHN R. KUHNS 

Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania 

Juan it a College, B.S. 






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Boiling Springs, Pennsylvania 
Haverford College B.A. 





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Larchmont, New York 

Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology B.S. 






FORREST J. LANG 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania B.A. 








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Philadelphia, 

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Muhlenberg College 

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University 





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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

University of Pennsylvania B.A. 






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Phoenix, Arizona 
Stanford University A.B. 





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JAMES J. MacFADYEN 
Havertown, Pennsylvania 
Villanova University A.B. 





STEPHEN MACHINTON 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania A.B. 

Steven, Nancy 





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STEPHEN A. M ATARAZZO 

Springfield, Pennsylvania 

St. Joseph's College B.S. 






JAMES R. McCOLE 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph's College B.S. 





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EDWARD P. McMAHON 

Corry, Pennsylvania 

Washington And Jefferson 

College B.A. 








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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Albright College B.S. 





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RICHARD S. MEYER 

New York, New York 

Pale College B.S. 



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Reading, Pennsylvania 
Albright College B.S. 





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GERALD M. MILLER 

Phillipsburg, New Jersey 

Lafayette College A.B. 







LEE H. MILLER 
Wynnewood, Pennsylvania 
George Washington University A.B. 





Lee, Lynne 




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MAYER R. MINTZ 

Maiden, Massachusetts 

Massachusetts College of 

Pharmacy B.S. M.S. 





FREDERICK T. MURRAY 

Wayne, Pennsylvania 

Franklin and Marshall College B.A. 





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Ralph, Lois 

RALPH E. NAZZARO 

Hawthorne, New Jersey 

Fordham College B.S. 




JOHN R. O'NEAL 

Prospect Park, Pennsylvania 

Albright College B.S. 





Jack, Barbara 



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WILLIAM T. POIRIER 

Flushing, New York 
Queens College B.A. 






MARK PRAGER 

Yonkers, New York 

Johns Hopkins University B.A. 

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MELVYN P. RICHTER 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

University of Pennsylvania B.A. 






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MICHAEL V. ROCK 
Springfield, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph's College B.S. 





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LAWRENCE N. ROSSI 

Trenton, New Jersey 

Fordham College B.A. 





MILLARD A. RUDDELL 
Dwight, Illinois 
University of Illinois B.S. 





Millard, Katherine 




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VADIM M. SCHALDENKO 

Irvington, New Jersey 
Seton Hall University B.A. 






JOHN C. SCHANTZ 

Ephrata, Pennsylvania 

Franklin and Marshall College B.A. 

John, Diane, Stephen 





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FREDERIC H. SCHIFFER 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania B.A. 



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New York, New York 
University of Wisconsin B.A. 





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H. JAY SICHERMAN 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 

New York University B.A. 



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Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Pennsylvania State 
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Camden, New Jersey 

Rutgers University B.A. 




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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Dickinson College B.A. 





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JON D. STEN 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State University B.S. 



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Narbeth, Pennsylvania 
Franklin and Marshall College B.A. 





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WILLIAM M. TRACHTENBERG 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

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Havertown, Pennsylvania 
Villanova University B.A. 





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Wyncote, Pennsylvania 
Amherst College B.A. 





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Danvers, Massachusetts 
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Wayne, Pennsylvania 
John Hopkins University B.A. 





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Rockville Centre, New York 

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University B.A. 





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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

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Bellefontaine, Ohio 

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The Oath and Prayer of 

Maimonides 



THE ETERNAL PROVIDENCE HAS APPOINTED ME to watch 
over the life and health of Thy creatures. May the love for my 
art actuate me at all times; may neither avarice, nor miserliness, 
nor the thirst for glory, nor for a great reputation engage my 
mind; for the enemies of Truth and Philanthropy could easily 
deceive me and make me forgetful of my lofty aim of doing 
good to Thy children. 

May I never see in the patient anything but a fellow crea- 
ture in pain. 

Grant me strength, time and opportunity always to correct 
what I have acquired, always to extend its domain; for know- 
ledge is immense and the spirit of man can extend infinitely 
to enrich itself daily with new requirements. Today he can 
discover his errors of yesterday and tomorrow he may obtain 
a new light on what he thinks himself sure of today. 

O God, Thou has appointed me to watch over the life and 
death of Thy creatures; here I am ready for my vocation. 

And now I turn unto my calling: 
O stand by me, my God, in this truly important task; 
Grant me success! For — 
Without Thy loving counsel and support, 
Man can avail but naught. 
Inspire me with true love for this my art 
And for Thy creatures, 
O grant — 

That neither greed for gain, nor thirst for fame, nor vain ambition, 
May interfere with my activity. 

For these I know are enemies of Truth and Love of men, 
And might beguile one in profession 
From furthering the welfare of Thy creatures. 
O strengthen me. 

Grant energy unto both body and soul 
That I might e'er unhindered ready be 
To mitigate the woes, 
Sustain and help 

The rich and poor, the good and bad, enemy and friend. 
O let me e'er behold in the afflicted and suffering, 
Only the human being. 

! ' TWELFTH CENTURY A.D. 






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